Contact us:

Heck yeah we want to hear from you! Go ahead and shoot us a note.

Want to make immediate contact? Call or text Malena at (907) 957-1007 or Eric at (907) 518-4158.

You can also send an old fashioned email to schoolhousefish@gmail.com.

Want fish? Got questions? We're all ears...


Petersburg, AK
USA

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fish tails blog

Schoolhouse stories and troller talk from Southeast Alaska.

Filtering by Category: fishing updates

Early bird gets the fish! Announcing our 2019 Fish Club dates & deadlines

Malena Marvin

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Introducing our 2019 Fish Clubs

Our “Fish Club” business model was created to connect our hardworking fishing community here in Petersburg to diverse communities around the US through a shared love and reverence for wild fish. Each year we strive to get a little better at making these connections as fun and seamless as we can. Here’s what we have planned for 2019!

New early bird dates & deadlines

Heads up! To get closer to a “fish to order” business, we’re moving our early bird deadlines into the spring. Your pre-orders help us plan our fishing season around your preferences so we can get you the freshest and most delicious fish possible. Dates to plan on for 2019:

  • April 10 - ongoing: Fish Club Registration for Captains
    Captains registering clubs by May 1st lock in early bird pricing for their clubs, but registrations continues all season! Register your club. (Learn more about how Fish Clubs work here.)

  • April 20-May 20: Early Bird Ordering
    Once your club is registered, Fish Club “crew” members can pre-order with early bird pricing through May 20th.

New Clubs shipping every month

As we add more Fish Clubs around the country and more seafood offerings from our catch, we’ve rebooted how we ship.

In 2019 we’ve got new mixes of seasonal seafood shares each month from June-October. Preview them right here. Captains can register for one or more months. To keep shipping costs affordable, we just ask that you meet our 80-100 lb shipping minimum for each monthly shipment you sign up for. All Fish Clubs ship mid-month and we’ll accept orders till the last day of the previous month. Specific dates for each month are here.

New fishes for you

New this year (drum roll please) are delicious black cod (sablefish) shares caught by Eric and Captain Steve. Black cod is a real Petersburg favorite - by far the richest, most buttery and delicious fish we catch and we’re thrilled to offer it to you. We’re also happy to be offering halibut and frozen smoked salmon shares in 2019. Yum! All of this comes in addition to our usual ling cod, rockfish, halibut cheeks, coho, and king salmon.

It’s all about community

We know we couldn’t do what we do here in Petersburg, Alaska without the support of our friends, neighbors, and partner businesses. Our Fish Clubs help connect this awesome community to your awesome community, a business model that keeps our prices very competitive. Because each of you are part of our business, we welcome your feedback and questions any time. Just call or text or email!

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A fishermen's honeymoon

Malena Marvin

After doubling our sales in two years at Schoolhouse Fish, planning a wild Love Celebration in Alaska for a few hundred of our closest friends, and wrapping up three years of breast cancer treatment, we’re overdue for a honeymoon. We’ll walk as many working fishing harbors as we can on the Yucátan peninsula, we’ll be back to Alaska in March to throw off the lines and troll up another season.

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Blooming lupines & spring season's catch

Malena Marvin

The wild lupines are blooming and the house smells like fish guts and diesel. It must be time to start getting the spring's catch from our shores to your doors! 

New in stock at Schoolhouse Fish Co. are line-caught yelloweye rockfish, halibut cheeks, and lingcod. These classic white and flaky fish fillets make for delightful main fish dish recipes, yummy fish tacos, or delicious fish & chips. All fillets are individually packaged in approximately 1 lb packages, and available by special order by species or mixed together in our 25 lb Fish Mix boxes. As always, if you can get a crew together to order 100 lbs or more, shipping is free and you get 5 lbs free fish for your trouble, and we handle all the invoicing. Inquire for wholesale rates for stores and restaurants.

Eric's been fishing our halibut "quota" with Captain Steve Enge, a 5th generation Petersburg fisherman and Eric's fishing buddy and mentor of 12 years.  Lingcod and rockfish come up often on the halibut lines, so we're working on marketing these yummy fish whose flavor and health benefits rival those of the better known salmon and halibut. Back on shore, Malena helps cut halibut cheeks, a special fillet from the tender flesh on either side of the halibut's heads. We sold out of cheeks last year, and supplies are limited for all of the spring white fishes, so let us know if you're interested.

And stay tuned for an interview with Captain Steve on sustainable fishing and mentorship in the Petersburg fishing fleet. Generations of learned knowledge pass from Steve's family to ours every time Eric hops aboard the F/V Monarch for another trip, and we want to share some of the stories with you...

Halibut in the belly of the F/V Monarch, where Eric longlines for halibut with his longtime fishing mentor Captain Steve Enge.

Malena cutting halibut cheeks!

The F/V Monarch enjoys a sunset Petersburg harbor style.

The F/V Monarch enjoys a sunset Petersburg harbor style.

Eric walks and chats with fishing mentor Captain Steve Enge on the schoolhouse tide flats.

Eric walks and chats with fishing mentor Captain Steve Enge on the schoolhouse tide flats.

Salmon seasons & the tidal life

Malena Marvin

The last few days, like all days in coastal Alaska, were all about tides. Eric rose at 4:30 am on Monday to bring our boat over to the harbor "grid" on high tide, so that when the tide went out we could do pre-season work underneath. The day before, I waited for high tide so I could hop on my paddle board in the tidal slough across our house and paddle out through the harbor to the Inside Passage. Work and play run on the tides here in Alaska, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

Like the tides, the salmon we catch and bring to you have a rhythm, and it's a rhythm we must follow. Most Americans are used to a different cultural rhythm, 9-5, five days a week, and grocery stores full of all food available all the time. Thanks to farmed salmon, Americans expect fresh "salmon" any day of the year. But the real deal is seasonal, and customers who know their fishermen get the unique privilege of learning to think like a wild salmon.

Wait, how did we get that boat up there?! We tied up at high tide, and waited for the water to go out so we could get to work. You can see how dramatic our tidal shifts are by looking at all the other boats and the whole harbor below us!

Wait, how did we get that boat up there?! We tied up at high tide, and waited for the water to go out so we could get to work. You can see how dramatic our tidal shifts are by looking at all the other boats and the whole harbor below us!

One of the things we want to do with our business is invite you into the rhythm of our lives and get you on wild salmon schedule. While there is some salmon trolling (for the elusive and delicious king salmon) in the winter and spring, most Alaskans catch their salmon (including kings, coho, and sockeye) in the summer and fall. State biologists hold salmon "openings" according to when the different species of fish are running and the type of boat and permit (we have a troller, which have different timed openings than gill netters or seiners). All of these distinct "fisheries" are carefully regulated by Alaska to target the appropriate part of the salmon runs at the right time. Different species run at different times and in different places all over the state. Toss in all the other seafood Alaskans catch commercially - crab, shrimp, halibut, etc. - and it makes for a well-orchestrated symphony of boats coming and going to fish their various openings around the rim of the North Pacific.

The tidal changes in the "narrows" outside our harbor make for swift water if you hit them at the wrong time. Paddlers learn to time their outings with the tides to make sure they are working with the current, not against. 

The tidal changes in the "narrows" outside our harbor make for swift water if you hit them at the wrong time. Paddlers learn to time their outings with the tides to make sure they are working with the current, not against. 

This April, Eric has just wrapped up his first fishery, herring roe-on-kelp, which is timed with the spring herring run. For many Alaskans - whether  human, bird or marine mammal - the arrival of these tiny, spawning, silver fish means spring has sprung. Next up for us, Eric is preparing to go longlining for halibut and black cod on a friend's boat (ours is set up for salmon trolling). He'll go on a few longlining trip this year to fill his "quota", and we'll cut halibut cheeks when he gets home for our Fish Mix boxes. We'll do some limited king salmon trolling in May when there are openings near our house, but trolling for kings will start for real in June, when Eric and I will go out fishing together as much as possible. While cohos will come around in mid-summer, we think the best quality coho salmon are caught in late summer and fall, so that's when we'll be fishing for the coho that have become a freezer staple for so many of you. We'll also save halibut and rockfish fillets for our Fish Mix boxes while we're salmon trolling.

Of course we can keep salmon in the freezer and dole them out gradually, and we will, but we want you, our valued customers, to know when we're going to be catching and selling the freshest fish. So get with the salmon seasons and check out our 2016 fish list and salmon schedule. Sign up to receive updates and we'll let you know what's fresh. Advance orders help us plan our season and prioritize the fish that you want, so let us know what you're thinking, and we'll make sure and fish direct for you. 

Old Grandmother Tide waits for no one, and so the heat is on once the tools come out. Whether things are going well or not, barnacle-busting and wrenching around must be wrapped up before high tide sneaks up again!

Old Grandmother Tide waits for no one, and so the heat is on once the tools come out. Whether things are going well or not, barnacle-busting and wrenching around must be wrapped up before high tide sneaks up again!